Career Moves: Preparing Yourself for Work That Matters

November 13, 2020

In this session, panelists representing broad experience in the educational development profession will offer insights from their various positions and career moves to attendees interested in entering the field. Panelists will discuss i) the rewards of a career in educational development, including advancing professional value for ourselves and colleagues; ii) similarities and differences between faculty and educational development positions; iii) strategies for job-market success and perspectives from hiring committees; and iv) the skills, knowledge, and expertise needed to successfully engage in this work. We will also explore emerging opportunities within our field.

Cultivating and Connecting Capstone Conversations

November 13, 2020

While faculty recognize capstones as vital high-impact practices, questions linger over their purpose and the structures required to support equitable implementation. Faculty stories emerging from our multi-institutional study highlight not only the importance of institution-wide conversations that promote understanding of and investment in the capstone, but also power dynamics that deter instructors from initiating conversations about unclear goals and workload inequities. Our asynchronous, interactive session guides participants through scenarios where they navigate these tensions as an instructor, department chair, or educational developer. These storylines--drawn from our research findings--are accompanied by heuristics designed to promote significant, intersecting conversations across institutional contexts.

Challenges and Impact: Sustaining Community in a Remote Pedagogy Course

November 13, 2020

With the move to a remote teaching and learning environment, instructor development has also moved remote. In this roundtable, participants will consider a case study of a well established future faculty pedagogy course that was adapted to a remote learning experience, including a discussion of challenges faced in creating and sustaining community, and the impact of making previously implicit teaching methods more explicit, both on the students and the course. This roundtable aims to create a space for sharing experiences and collaborating on plans to translate lessons learned into lasting impacts on future pedagogy courses and the future faculty participants.

The Power of Narratives in Evaluating and Influencing Educational Development Practices

November 13, 2020

Efforts to evaluate educational development practice and communicate impact have long focused on attendance, satisfaction, and retention numbers. Though informative, these data cannot fully convey or demystify the complexity of the human experience. Collecting and analyzing narratives - from both developers and participants - can help us to articulate impact, identify quality, and inform planning and decision-making (McClintock, 2004; Van Manen, 1994). In this session, participants will have an opportunity to explore the use of narratives as a research tool and identify approaches to assess practice, identify interventions, and communicate impact through narratives.

Who heals the healers? Supporting emerging leaders through radical compassion

November 13, 2020

This roundtable is a place to collectively explore models of self-leadership critical to healing institutional inequities and harms laid bare during the COVID-19 pandemic. Facilitators and participants will share what we've learned from the pandemic about what we need as servant-leaders, about harmful norms to reject, and about clarified values to retain. We aim to build a peer mentoring network that honors personal storytelling and inner wisdom in pursuit of growth in self-leadership. We will collectively chart a forward-looking path that creatively responds to the changing higher education environment and that promotes equity, mindfulness, courage, creativity, and compassion.

Plenary 4:Global Faculty Development: 5 Countries, 11 Campuses and Why it Matters for Everyone

November 13, 2020

With increasingly interconnected global higher education, the shortcomings of dominant Anglo-American models of educational development are exposed when transposed upon emergent higher education communities and global First Nations' contexts. Moreover, as educational development becomes increasingly professionalized, harmful gaps and toxic cultures arise from blind spots created by disciplinary "best-practices". This experiential session examines our profession's limitations and the potentially detrimental constraints of faculty development modes we practice on our own campuses. This session encourages strategies for more critical reflexive practices that will benefit the profession and underserved populations of faculty and students.

Responding with Nimbleness: Teaching Centers through a Human Resource Lens

November 12, 2020

Teaching center leaders are at the forefront of shifting priorities and activities. Sector-wide and institutional changes necessitate centers to be nimble and pivot quickly in order to be successful. One key competency helping centre leaders prepare in times of major change is human resources (HR) leadership (Dawson, Britnell, & Hitchcock, 2010). We outline four critical HR leadership aspects – organizational structure, direction-setting, capacity-building, and accountability – relevant to centre leaders, and provide prompts to encourage reflection on these aspects and plan next steps.

Applying Student-Faculty Partnership Lessons in a Negotiated Course Redesign

November 12, 2020

The principles of reciprocity, mutuality, and respect that characterize student-faculty partnerships build civic capacity and increase student agency. Including students in curriculum decisions incorporates these principles of equity and inclusion and deepens learning. This workshop will explore the lessons learned in a student-faculty partnership and examine their application in a sustainability education classroom by inviting students to negotiate the curriculum. Participants will reflect on the challenges and opportunities inherent in enlisting students in course design and consider the student agency that comes from that process.

Professor Burnout: How Do You Identify and Destigmatize Faculty Burnout?

November 12, 2020

Faculty often say they feel burned out. But feeling burned out is not the same as burnout, a workplace syndrome frequently impacting professionals in caring professions, like faculty. And when productivity and reputation are the coin of the realm, burnout can feel like a shameful weakness rather than an opportunity to reassess and grow. In this interactive session, we will define and learn to recognize burnout and apply a framework based in purpose, compassion, connection, and balance to work with burned-out faculty. Participants will leave with extensive resources and a plan for a session on faculty burnout for their campuses.

Getting On the Balcony: Adaptive Leadership and Curriculum Reform

November 12, 2020

Curriculum reform -- typically a high-stakes enterprise -- can be challenging in today's climate. However, the theory of adaptive leadership empowers educational developers to successfully identify, analyze, and address "systemic problems with no ready answers" (Heifetz & Laurie, 1997). A flexible paradigm coined by business and public policy experts, adaptive leadership empowers us to approach curriculum design and development as an "adaptive challenge" (Wolfe, 2015). Using our flagship graduate program's ongoing reform as a case study, our interactive session encourages participants to reflect on their own adaptive challenges and, collaboratively, articulate innovative solutions to common obstacles to organizational change.